Animals In Service



Exhibition

Commemorating 100th Anniversary of the Battle of the Somme

7th-8th, 14th-15th, 21st-22nd and 28th-30th May 2016

Animals in Service - public art exhibition commemorates the anniversary of the Battle of the Somme through the huge contribution that 16 million animals in the First World War made in transport, logistics, cavalry and communications, as well as in the morale of troops. This exhibition tells the story of these animals before the war, during the war, and the lasting legacies they left after the war. The horses and camels used for transportation, the dogs, pigeons and songbirds used as messengers, together with those chosen as mascots and used in the propaganda of war. Also parasites contribution to the spread of trench fever will be considered as well as the huge advances made in medicines to control epidemics after the war.

July 1, 1916 was the worst day in the history of the British Army. On this day in 1916, 150,000 British troops emerged from their trenches to attack the German lines near the River Somme in northern France. By the end of the day, the British had suffered almost 60,000 casualties, including 19,240 dead including the death of around 60% of its officers in just a single day of fighting. The Allies opened the offensive with a week-long pounding of the German line, firing over one and a half million shells. The sheer numbers of animals to have died is staggering. It is no wonder that Brigadier-General Frank Percy Crozier after the Battle of the Somme stated, "My heart bleeds for the horses and mules". Some eight million horses were to lose their lives by explosions, bullets, disease, exposure or starvation between 1914 and 1918.

The Animals In War Memorial in Brook Gate, Park Lane in London is a permanent tribute to the plethora of species that served during the wars, the horses, dogs, monkeys, bears, pigeons, mules, and the glow-worm. The inscription reads: This monument is dedicated to all the animals that served and died alongside British and Allied forces in wars and campaigns throughout time. They had no choice. This public art exhibition Animals in Service is our tribute to the animals lost in the First World War. The exhibition is curated by Jolanta Jagiello and is funded by Southwark Council Neighbourhood Fund.

In Association With:

Animals In Service on Tour

Animals In Service Comments Book

Animals/mw1.JPGGone to the Dogs
by Monica Wheeler
Artist Statement
Animals/mw2.JPGWe are Making a New World
by Monica Wheeler
Artist Statement
Animals/mw3.JPGPaw Paw Not War War
by Monica Wheeler
Artist Statement
Animals/jj1.JPGLondon Zoos Winnie
by Jolanta Jagiello
Artist Statement
Animals/jj2.JPGLieutenant Colebourns Mascot
by Jolanta Jagiello
Artist Statement
Animals/jj3.JPGBlack Bears Natural Habitat
by Jolanta Jagiello
Artist Statement
Animals/lsk1.JPGAnimals Service Commemorated
by Louise Severyn-Kosinska
Artist Statement
Animals/lsk2.JPGAnd light them at the fiery glow-worms eyes
by Louise Severyn-Kosinska
Artist Statement
Animals/lsk3.JPGLet Sleeping Dogs Lie
by Louise Severyn-Kosinska
Artist Statement
Animals/nsf1.JPGThe Surrounding Countryside after 1914
by Nicky Scott-Francis
Artist Statement
Animals/nsf2.JPGPigeons released from a Tank - Battle of the Somme
by Nicky Scott-Francis
Artist Statement
Animals/nsf3.JPGThe Surrounding Countryside Before 1914
by Nicky Scott-Francis
Artist Statement
Animals/ecm1.JPGFor Hereos
by Elizabeta Chojak-Mysko
Artist Statement
Animals/ecm2.JPGBefore the Battle
by Elizabeta Chojak-Mysko
Artist Statement
Animals/ecm3.JPGIn the Desert
by Elizabeta Chojak-Mysko
Artist Statement
Animals/ss1.JPGModern Hygiene
by Sara Scott
Artist Statement
Animals/ss2.JPGIn the bowels in the earth
by Sara Scott
Artist Statement
Animals/ss3.JPGLiving the Harmony
by Sara Scott
Artist Statement
Animals/jr1.JPGCeremonial
by Jill Rock
Artist Statement
Animals/jr2.JPGWW1
by Jill Rock
Artist Statement
Animals/jr3.JPGThe 19th Century
by Jill Rock
Artist Statement